COMMON WATER – COMMON GROUND

Where Oil and Gas meets Wind, Wave and Tidal
30th – 31st May 2012

New Drumossie Hotel, Inverness

This is a two-day conference with the aim of bringing together players from across the region’s marine energy industries.

Organised by the University of the Highlands and Islands’ Energy Research Group, the aim of this event is to facilitate the sharing of knowledge between offshore sectors, including established oil and gas businesses as well as companies in the emerging renewables market. It is being increasingly recognised there is much common ground between the skills and knowledge needed to develop marine renewable installations and those which are currently used in the oil and gas sector.

Companies entering the renewables sector can learn from established offshore operators and there are huge opportunities for supply chain businesses to get involved with emerging technologies. This event, the first of its kind in the Highlands and Islands, will explore these issues for businesses interested in technological innovation or diversifying into new sectors. Delegates will get the chance to meet decision makers and learn about new developments.

The detailed programme is still being put together but the CWCG FLYER gives the gist of what will be covered over the 2 days. We’re also giving delegates/businesses the chance to showcase their work/innovations/interests for 5 minutes if they want to.

Registration and Cost: Delegate places can be booked now, with a registration fee of £95. Fee covers attendance at all sessions over the 2 days, and the conference dinner on the evening of Wednesday, 30th May.

Places can be booked on the website or by email to contact@cw-cg.org or by calling Fiona O’Fee on 0800 032 8080.

EVENT WEBSITE

EIMR International conference now fully booked

May 1-3 2012, Kirkwall.

It’s very encouraging to announce that we have now closed the delegate list for this event having exceeded our 200 delegate limit. We have have opened a ‘standby’ list for anyone still wishing to attend should another delegate need to cancel – if you would like to be added to this list please contact contact@eimr.org

A draft programme is now available HERE (please remember this is still subject to change) and information for delegates is available HERE

See all details at the EIMR conference website.

New science features and news site launched…..

A new website, ScienceOmega, aimed at showcasing high-quality scientific features and news has been launched and may be worth keeping an eye on.

It is boasting quite a list of contributors – Sir Patrick Moore, Executive Director of the Nobel Foundation Dr Lars Heikensten, Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Dr Hamadoun Touré, President of the United States’ Council for Chemical Research (CCR) Dr Seth Snyder, Chief Executive of the Society of Biology Dr Mark Downs.

It is aiming to cover a very wide range of disciplines. Science Omega says it “has one overarching goal; to communicate high-quality scientific content to the largest possible audience. It is paramount that Science Omega contains content that will interest the scientific community. However, science cannot afford to be elitist, and we are convinced that if we present material in a clear and engaging way, it will prove fascinating for scientists and non-scientists alike.”

UKERC analysis – relative energy costs

Data from Robert Gross at Imperial College London – graph from The Guardian

The following caught my eye in a series run last week by The Guardian, a interesting adjuct to the previous article.

Key to plots:

GAS – Rising wholesale gas prices have driven the UK’s rising energy bills in recent years. Forecasts show a wide range of cost scenarios, reflecting uncertainty over a fuel which is increasingly imported

OFFSHORE WIND – The cost of offshore wind rose dramatically in the last decade, due in part to steel prices and supply chain shortages. Authoritative forecasts suggest costs will come down 25% by 2025

ONSHORE WIND – Onshore turbines are likely to stabilise in cost, according to a range of forecasts, which have a relatively narrow spread of outcomes. Expected to become cheaper than gas this decade

FULL DETAILS OF ARTICLES AND STATS FROM UKERC